Heart Rock Herb & Spice Co. LLC - Spice of the Month Club
Heart Rock Herb & Spice Co. LLC -
Spice of the Month Club
A membership in the Spice of the Month Club makes a "spicy" wedding gift too!
 
Through the pleasures of our herb & spice blends you can transport you and your family to far way places; a culinary trip of a lifetime without leaving your kitchen. A membership in the Spice of the Month Club is a  great way to gain confidence with spice blends, make meal time fast and enjoyable. There's no more need to have dozens of individual jars of herbs and spices in your cupboard. Recipes can be made with ease and convenience. Our blends save time & money! We do the blending work - you enjoy the praises!
 

Membership Includes:
 An introductory welcome letter explaining what the Club offers,
duration of membership and by whom it was purchased, along
with a gift message if submitted.    
 
Each month's package will include:          
  •  2.0 oz tin hand mixed spice blend, see list below
  •  Information on blend ingredients and/or country/region, see letter below
  •  Recipe and suggestions on how to use the blends
  •  2 Tablespoons of a bonus blend in poly bag
                                             
 
 Packages ship on the 15th of the month,
newsletter is emailed to recipient 
unless it falls on a Saturday or Sunday

Subscriptions will start the month payment is received, unless another month is requested. Please provide this information upon check out. All blends are available for purchase throughout the year.
 

Main Spice Blend 2017                        Bonus Blend

June - Salmon Rub (New!)                         Scandinavian                                             
July - Moroccan ~ Ras El Hanout            Spanish
August - Jamaican Jerk                               BBQ Tahoe Style
September - Smoky Mt. High                    Herbs de Provence
October - Tahoe Blend                                  Tahoe Taco
November - Perfect All-Purpose               Polish/German
December - Chili Red                                    Smoked Salt & Pepper


Fine Print~Heart Rock Herb & Spice Co. reserves the right to substitute blends when necessary.
Thanks for considering our club, we hope you join or give as a gift!
 
  • Please choose the gift occasion and type in the name, shipping and email address of the recipient, (use email address box if shipping info. line is full
  • Record Gift Message and Start Membership Month when checking out on the Pay Pal page, under Instructions to the Seller/Merchant
  • Newsletter will be sent digitally, please include the recipients email address
  • Price includes 6 months worth of postage!


Six Month                                                            Twelve Month
Subscription $62.95                                        Subscription $119.95

Choose Gift Occasion
Name & Ship Address- Recipient
Email Address of Recipient
Choose Gift Occasion
Name & Ship Address-Recipient
Email Address of Recipient
Additional shipping cost to Hawaii, Alaska and Canada- $25

Mail check to:
Heart Rock
Herb & Spice Co.
PO Box 5097
Stateline, NV 89449 
 Speaking of praises, here's a few! 
"My daughter says this is her favorite birthday gift of all time". (Mom renewed membership this year) "Because we live so far apart, it helps to keep us in touch. She calls when a new kit comes or when she makes a great meal using the spices. It has been a wonderful adventure for us both! We really appreciate the personal touch. It is so hard to find anymore".
Thanks again, Robin

I am into my second year of the monthly club thanks to my wonderful partner. I love your blends and use them almost every time I cook - they are just enough and I don't worry about them going stale in the cabinet. Last night I tried your Thai style for the first time. I marinated pork chops in soy sauce (I use Tabasco Spicy Soy), lemon juice (had a couple of lemons that really needed to be used...), a drizzle of honey, and a generous sprinkling of the Thai blend. Threw them under the broiler about an hour later, and pure deliciousness! I haven't had a blend yet that I can't use in some way. Thank you so much for the care and heart you put into every tin! 
Sincerely, Sue

An example of a newsletter that accompanies your spice blends and recipes.

March 2011 Spice of the Month- Ras el Hanout
 
Tahoe winters can bring a ton of snow-many years the most in the country. As I write in mid February we’ve received over 350 inches for the season, that includes 42” in the last 48 hours. It’s a curse or blessing depending on which side of the snow shovel you stand. As a gardener I realize we need the moisture for our spring daffodils and tulips, it’s waiting until mid May to see them. That can cause major cabin fever! 
 
So in the winter I cook… a lot.

Last winter a number of Thunderbird Lodge gardeners (a Historic site on the East Shore of Lake Tahoe) participated in one of my cooking classes. It’s no surprise that the use of dried lavender buds for cooking is a perennial favorite with this group, but we needed more flower power than that. While researching recipes, I found one that used a spice blend that not only called for dried lavender but also dried rose petals. I was ecstatic! It’s called Ras el Hanout and is now a favorite.
 
A seed was planted... 
Ras el Hanout means “top of the shop”, the best combination of spices that can be provided by a Moroccan spice merchant. It can contain more than 30 different ingredients within hundreds of variations. Ours is representative of what you’d find in many Arabic countries.
 
There are stories of spice merchants creating custom blends for special clients that included hashish and even Spanish fly! Our own version nixed those but does include traditional spices such as cardamom, allspice, coriander, cumin, fennel, cinnamon, turmeric, ginger, cloves, black pepper, and grains of paradise besides the lavender and rose petals.
 
A good Ras el Hanout is a great example of how well a variety of spices can meld to create an ingredient that is greater than its individual components.
 
It has a spicy kick without the heat and subtle nuances of floral fragrance all within an overall robust flavor. Sounds like we’re wine snobs describing the latest vintage of pinot noir! Yes, it’s complex but extremely versatile. Use as a spice rub on lamb chops before grilling or pan-frying, in chicken tagines and pork braises, add to grains like rice, quinoa, and cous cous and grind fine as a condiment. You can’t help but love it!
 
Some of the spices included in this blend are:
Cardamom:  A herbaceous perennial shrub in the ginger family. It produces pods that are harvested when green, sun-dried in the air like peppercorns and once opened reveal three segments, each with a tiny row of brownish-black seeds. As a spice they are costly, luckily their potent flavor justifies the cost as a little imparts a lot.
  
Coriander: A popular annual plant because all parts are used: leaves (known as cilantro), seeds (coriander) and roots. In Europe, it’s considered an aphrodisiac- no wonder it’s popular! The common coriander imparts a lemony, mustard flavor that works well as a base in curries, barbecue rubs and most Middle Eastern spice blends.
 
Although not a prominent ingredient in this blend, grains of paradise (love that name) is worth mentioning because it’s an unfamiliar spice to most of us. Also a member of the ginger family, grains of paradise come from a perennial reed-like plant native to West Africa. Its flowers, shaped like lilies, produce a tough leathery husk that looks like a giant brown cardamom pod, each of which contains about 80 seeds. The seeds emit little aroma until cracked or ground. When dried they’re a cross between pepper and ginger with an undercurrent of clove and cardamom. Here’s that wine speak again, but this spice has such a diverse flavor it’s warranted. Because grains of paradise was less expensive than black pepper and was readily available, it became fashionable to use in medieval days. It fell out of favor when the trade for the latter became more accessible. Today, you’ll see it used in everything from beer brewing to confections. The exotic tales surrounding this interesting spice no doubt have something to do with its modern day popularity among chefs.